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MSE Graduate Courses

To enroll in these courses, please refer to the Materials Science and Engineering section of the Tickle College of Engineering’s Graduate Catalog page.


4 Credit Hours
X-ray diffraction and fluorescence; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; microanalytical techniques.
(RE) Prerequisite(s): Physics 232.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Description of stress and strain. Linear elastic constitutive equations; isotropic and anisotropic moduli in various materials. Yield criteria; brittle fracture; crazing; plastic strain constitutive equations. Forming operations and limit criteria.
(RE) Prerequisite(s): 302.
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to nuclear fuels and materials in light water reactors, with a focus on the effect of irradiation on properties and performance.

(RE) Prerequisite(s): Mechanical Engineering 331 or Materials Science and Engineering 260
(RE) Corequisite(s): 201; and Mechanical Engineering 321 or Materials Science and Engineering 302.
3 Credit Hours
Metals, polymers, and ceramics utilized in orthopedic, cardiovascular, and dental surgical implant devices. Corrosion and degradation problems. Material properties of primary importance and tissue response to synthetic materials. Cross-listed: (Same as Biomedical Engineering 474.)

(RE) Prerequisite(s): 201.
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Industrial Engineering 483.)
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Industrial Engineering 484.)
1-15 Credit Hours
Grading Restriction: P/NP only.
Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
1-3 Credit Hours
Grading Restriction: S/NC
Repeatability: May be repeated, maximum 9 hours.
Credit Restriction: May not be used toward degree requirements.
1-15 Credit Hours
Required for the student not otherwise registered during any semester when student uses university facilities and/or faculty time before degree is completed.

Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only. Repeatability: May be repeated.
Credit Restriction: May not be used toward degree requirements.
Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
1 Credit Hours
Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only. Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Credit Restriction: For MS students, a maximum of 3 hours may be applied to the major. For PhD students with MS, a maximum of 3 hours may be applied to the major. For PhD students directly from BS, a maximum of 6 hours may be applied to the major.

Comment(s): Admission to graduate program required.
3 Credit Hours
Formulation and solution of problems in materials science, including linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, ordinary and partial differential equations, and integral equations. Emphasize on use of modern computational tools.
3 Credit Hours
Structure of materials: chemical bonding in materials, crystal structure, defects in crystals, diffraction.
3 Credit Hours
Mechanics of materials: Stress and strain at a point, elastic constitutive equations, phenomenological bulk behavior, deformation mechanisms.
3 Credit Hours
Thermodynamics of materials: thermodynamics, diffusion, phase diagram, kinetics.
3 Credit Hours
Electronics, optics and magnetism: electrical and thermal conduction, quantum physics, band theory, dielectrics, magnetic and optical properties.
3 Credit Hours
Applications of diffusion to material processing. Diffusion in dilute and concentrated alloys. Thermo- and electro-transport in solids. Grain boundaries and interfaces. Grain boundary diffusion. Recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth. Thermally activated phase transformations. Diffusionless transformations.

Recommended Background: 513.
3 Credit Hours
Deformation and fracture of metals and alloys: dislocation theory, strengthening mechanisms, macro-scale descriptions of plasticity, fracture mechanics, fatigue, and time-dependent behavior.

Recommended Background: 512.
3 Credit Hours
Analytical and experimental analysis of defect interactions in solids. Two papers are required that describe industrial or research applications that rely on the properties of defects in non-metal crystals for successful operation.

Recommended Background: 421.
3 Credit Hours
Welding processes; physical metallurgy of welding; phase transformations; heat flow; residual stresses; theories of hot cracking, cold cracking and porosity formation; applications to process utilization. A definitive project on welding metallurgy will be conducted, requiring a presentation and written report.
3 Credit Hours
The effect of the Welding Method on properties and performance for a full range of metallic alloys (e.g., Carbon and Alloy Steels, Stainless Steels, Aluminum and Ni Base Alloys) together with the effect of the specific joining process characteristics on Composite Materials, Ceramics and Plastics. Lecture and laboratory exercises.

Recommended Background: 525.
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 529.)
3 Credit Hours
Analysis of effect of stress state, strain rate, environment, temperature and metallurgical structure on mechanical behavior. Brittle fracture, creep, stress rupture and fatigue.
Recommended Background: Course in mechanical behavior.
3 Credit Hours
Molecular structure; shear thinning fluids and non-Newtonian rheology; rheometry; melt processing operations; molecular orientation; linear viscoelasticity; dynamic mechanical behavior; yield; fracture; mechanical properties of polymeric composites. Cross-listed: (Same as Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 539.)
3 Credit Hours
Synthesis, reactions and degradation of polymers. Molecular characterization: solution methods and spectroscopy. Recommended Background: Semester of organic chemistry and thermodynamics.
3 Credit Hours
Theories of solutions, statistical thermodynamics. Characterization, treatment of chromatography, viscosity, light scattering and osmotic pressure.

Recommended Background: Undergraduate physical chemistry course.
3 Credit Hours
Project-based polymer processing laboratory course. Groups of students will work on specific projects that involve polymer processing and characterization. Each semester-long project includes processing of polymer samples, characterization of mechanical and physical properties of the products, variation of processing parameters to determine effect on properties, and generation of oral and written reports. Students will be expected to design experiments, provide expectations of results, and draw final conclusions concerning processing-structure-property relationships.

Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Underlying physics of semiconductor materials used as photovoltaics and a review of the current state of the art of the materials. Different exams will be administered for the graduate students and an additional project will be required.

Recommended Background: 350 or equivalent.
3 Credit Hours
Basic experimental techniques and instrumentation associated with characterization, X-ray and light scattering, calorimetry, rheometry, mechanical properties of solid polymers, polymer processing operations.
3 Credit Hours
Nonwoven fabric technology; different web forming processes; and relationships among the chemical, morphological and mechanical properties of fibers and orientation in webs to final performance properties of bonded structures.

Recommended Background: Organic chemistry course or consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Underlying physics and operating principles of functional materials used in energy applications such as photovoltaics and photocatalysts, fuel cells, batteries, thermoelectrics, and superconductors. Class will conclude with a student report and presentation based on current research on one of the topics covered in class.

Recommended Background: 350.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy Recommended Background with consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Review of the atomic origin of magnetic moments and how these moments can be affected by their local environment. Properties, basic theory, and applications of para-, dia-, ferro-, ferri- and antiferromagnets. Novel magnetic phenomena and magnetic materials in modern technological applications. Class will conclude with student presentation/report on a research topic related to magnetism and magnetic materials.

Recommended Background: 350.
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Nuclear Engineering 588.)
3 Credit Hours
Fundamental aspects of modern ion beam analysis of materials, including elastic nuclear scattering, nuclear reaction analysis, ion beam channeling, and MeV ion microprobes.

Cross-listed: (Same as: Nuclear Engineering 544.)
3 Credit Hours
Symmetry of crystals, space group theory, reciprocal lattice and application to definition of structures; powder and single crystal X-ray techniques; introduction to crystal structure determination; characterization of orientation; application to inorganic, metallic and polymer structures.
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Nuclear Engineering 540.)
3 Credit Hours
Topics of current significance and interest.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Focuses on the biological/medical uses of nanoscale materials. Includes the following topics: 0-d, 1-d, and 2-d nanomaterials synthesis and characterization with an emphasis on surface properties. Chemical and biological functionalization of nanomaterials and nano-bio interfaces. Biological and biomedical application of nanomaterials. The state-of-the-art research papers will be reviewed and discussed.

Cross-listed: (Same as Biomedical Engineering 578.)
Recommended Background: 474.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Preparation of critical review of literature in area related to materials science and engineering. Must be taken by students in the non-thesis option.

Registration Permission: Consent of faculty committee.
3 Credit Hours
Study of the fundamental principles involved in materials /cell and tissue interactions. Students will learn the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms in host response to biomaterials. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of biomaterials/neuronal cells and tissue interactions into the design of neural implants (sensors, scaffolds, and therapeutics delivery modalities, etc.). Additional research paper assignments will be given to graduate students registered for this course.

Cross-listed: (Same as Biomedical Engineering 588.)
Recommended Background: 474.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
1-6 Credit Hours
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours. Credit Level Restriction: Graduate credit only. Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3-15 Credit Hours
Grading Restriction: P/NP only. Repeatability: May be repeated. Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Covers fundamentals of thermodynamics of materials at small length scales, particularly as related to the dynamics of phase transformations. Topics will include fundamentals of statistical mechanics, mean-field Landau theory of phase transformations, and dynamics of phase transformations. Basics will be illustrated using various simulation methods, including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, and phase-field modeling. Topics will be chosen according to time and student's interests.

Recommended Background: 513.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Computational modeling and simulation methods will be introduced with applications in plasticity, fracture and fatigue, microstructural evolution, and material instability in engineering structural materials. Topics include the classic finite element method based on constitutive modeling, cohesive interface model, discrete dislocation dynamics, atomistic/continuum coupling techniques, and current research areas that are pertinent to the research efforts at UT and ORNL.

Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to and applications of quantum mechanical modeling and simulation of advanced materials at electronic and atomic levels of description. Development of structure/property relationships for functional, structural, and energy materials.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.

Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to and applications of classical modeling and simulation of advanced materials at atomic and mesoscale levels of description. Development of structure/property relationships for functional, structural, and energy materials.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.

Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Students learn materials issues and thin film processing techniques used to manufacture semiconductor devices. Topics include basic vacuum technology, plasma physics, sputtering, evaporation (resistive, electron beam, laser ablation), chemical vapor deposition, and etching. The mechanisms of each process are explored and relevant material chemistries are discussed. Thin film growth models are also explained and processing variables are related to material properties.

Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Advanced topics in polymer rheology and mechanical behavior. Entangled and unentangled polymer dynamics, elastic behavior of melts; branched polymers; twin screw extrusion; blends; continuum modeling; thermoset processing; drawing operations; rubber toughening; thermoplastic elastomers; adhesion; radiation processing.

Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Focuses on optoelectronic processes involved in semiconducting materials and devices. The semiconducting materials include direct and in-direct bandgap materials. The devices primarily consist of light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and laser diodes. The fundamental processes will focus on 1) optical and electronic properties of semiconducting materials, 2) principle, design and characterization of optoelectronic devices, and 3) applications of laser spectroscopy in semiconducting materials. Will include lectures, experimental demonstrations, focused discussions, and presentations.

Recommended Background: 543 or equivalent.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites will be included. Topics include: temperature effect on stress-strain behavior, anelasticity, damping, creep, creep mechanisms, strengthening at high temperatures, creep rupture, deformation map and engineering application, environmental effects, high-temperature indentation, high temperature plastic forming, superplasticity, creep-fatigue interaction, life prediction. Provides scientific knowledge to face and solve material problems encountered in high temperature applications.

Recommended Background: 512.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Reviews the structure and properties of fibers and fiber formation methods, and discuss the principles of forming high performance fibers. Topics that will be covered include HS HM PE fibers, gel spinning , PVA fibers, HSHM fibers from cellulose, Nylon66 & PET, LC Polymers, fiber formation from LCPs, aromatic fibers, flame resistant organic fibers, carbon fibers, inorganic fibers, nanofibers, optical fibers, biodegradable fibers, absorbent fibers, etc.

Recommended Background: 553.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Cross-listed: (See Nuclear Engineering 662.)
3 Credit Hours
Basic principles of elastic and plastic contact as they influence the measurement of mechanical properties by load and depth sensing indentation methods. Application of nanoindentation techniques to small scale mechanical characterization of metals, ceramics, and polymers.

Recommended Background: 512.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Fundamentals of electron scattering, reciprocal space, the Ewald Sphere construction. Basic electron optics, operation of the transmission electron microscope TEM (includes some laboratory sessions) and sample preparation. The kinematical theory of imaging of perfect and imperfect crystals in the TEM. Problems with the kinematic theory. Introduction to the dynamical theory of TEM imaging. The effect of inelastic scattering in the TEM. Fundamentals of analytical electron microscopy. The Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) and its relation to the TEM.

Recommended Background: 405 or 511 or 572.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
A survey of techniques for surface imaging and characterization. Young's Topografiner, field emission, and the beginning of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Practical operation of the STM (includes laboratory sessions). Image resolution and interpretation in the STM, analytical STM imaging. The theory and control of feedback loops in SPM. The generalized Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) and the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Theory of operation of AFM, limits to resolution, and image interpretation (includes laboratory session). Important variants of the SPM including scanning capacitance, scanning near field optical, and scanning thermal microscopes. The metrology of nanoscale structures.

Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Starts with the description of the electronic states in regular crystals, and extends it to surfaces, interfaces, defects, amorphous and liquid state and strongly correlated electron systems including magnetism. Also, advanced experimental methods to study the electronic states and atomic structure are discussed.

Recommended Background: 511 and 514.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Introduces graduate students in materials science, physics, chemistry and biochemistry to modern methods of structural characterization using x-rays and neutrons. After a quick review of the basics, theories and practices necessary to carry out and utilize these advanced techniques will be covered.

Recommended Background: 511 and 514.
Comment(s): Prior knowledge may satisfy prerequisites, with consent of instructor.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
3 Credit Hours
Latest developments and/or advanced special topics.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 9 hours.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.

Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Directed and independent study of advanced topics.
Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.

Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
3 Credit Hours
Advanced electron diffraction methods, that use dynamic diffraction contrast and higher order Laue zones especially in convergent beam electron diffraction. High resolution electron microscopy and its image simulations. Atomic resolution Z-contrast and analytical transmission electron microscopy. This course requires a basic understanding of TEM and crystallography and will concentrate on analysis of data with free software. This class will focus on simulation and quantification of EELS spectra, and simulation and interpretation of atomic resolution imaging and diffraction pattern.

Recommended Background: 405 or 511 or 572, 672 or 673. Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – graduate.
Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.

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